Continent Allegories in the Baroque Age – A Research Database

A brief introduction by Dr. Marion Romberg from the Austrian research project „Erdteilallegorien im Barockzeitalter” at the University of Vienna’s Department of History

Link to the database: http://continentallegories.univie.ac.at

Visual Examples of continent allegories in the database (Screenshot)

During the late Renaissance – around 1570 – humanists developed a new “shorthand” way of representing the world at a single glance: personifications of the four continents Europe, Asia, Africa and America. While the continent allegory as an iconic type had already been invented in antiquity, humanists and their artists adapted the concept by creating the four-continent scheme and standardized the attributes characterizing the continents. During the next 230 years until ca. 1800, this iconic scheme became a huge success story. All known media were employed to bring the four continent allegories into the public and into people’s homes. Within this prolonged history of personifications of the continents, the peak was reached in the Late Baroque, and especially the 18th century. As a pictorial language they were interwoven with texts, dogmas, narratives and stereotypes. Thus the project team find himself asking: What did continent allegories actually mean to people living in the Baroque age?

The geographical dissemination of continent allegories in the South of the Holy Roman Empire (Screenshot)

Continue reading Continent Allegories in the Baroque Age – A Research Database